Tuesday, November 28, 2006

THE HERMIT (IX)

TODAY'S CARD IS The Hermit (IX). This version is from TAROT: The Complete Kit, published by Running Press, written by Dennis Fairchild, illustrated by Julie Paschkis (see mini-review below):



For comparison, here's The Hermit from the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE HERMIT (IX): The shells on the Simple Tarot's Ten of Pentacles image in my previous post reminded me of the above "hermit crab" desgin in The Complete Tarot. I think this IX is both humorous and makes its point. Here's another take on "isolation," a 1995 dream of mine that I've always thought of as my Hermit card dream. I tried turning it into a poem (unsuccessfully) and that's why it's worded and laid out the way it is:

in a room full of people
she is lonely,
her black cape
accentuating isolation

she feels briefly connected
when she sees that everyone
is robed in black

realizing we all wear around us
what remains unconscious
within us

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS FOR THE HERMIT (IX) (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

The "wounded healer." (Those who are healed become healers.)

Get out of your own way; i.e. ego is what is causing you the most trouble right now.

It would be wise to let go of people and/or activities/habits that are no longer working for you.

Time to tie up loose ends; a new project or challenge is on it way.

Use this dark time in your life to seek illumination from within (intuition, meditation, prayer, etc.).

May indicate someone who needs much more alone time than s/he is getting, and/or than most people need.

Someone who teaches/heals/guides simply by virtue of being who they are. (Whenever we let whatever our own light is shine brightly and fully we help those who see it.)


MINI-REVIEW ALERT: TAROT: The Complete Kit is a small deck (3" x 3-1/2," in a box not any bigger and about 2" deep) that I bought in one of those large gift/card chain stores. It was only $7.95 and surprised me when I opened it as it's really a nice, well-produced deck with original designs, echoing traditional Tarot with some humorous slants. The accompanying 88 page booklet is a really nice tiny book, with clear, pragmatic, somewhat unusual meanings -- no references to anything particularly esoteric, though intuition is mentioned, and a glossy color cover. The kit includes a layout map, and the card back design is delightfull. It might make a nice gift, especially as a first deck as the designs are not overly complicated though quite evocative and enjoyable.

* * * *

Resource: Physical Egg Tarot, simple Tarot card designs in color painted on intact egg shells!

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep letting your light shine brightly, and enjoying The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Sunday, November 26, 2006

THE TEN OF PENTACLES

TODAY'S CARD IS The Ten of Pentacles. This version is from Stone Riley's Simple Tarot.*



For comparison, here's The Ten of Pentacles in the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE TEN OF PENTACLES: I'm preparing to review Stone Riley's "Magic Mirror Tarot" which is a double deck set, made of the Simple Tarot (see mini-review below in this post) and The Spirit Hill Tarot (see my review here). In going through the Simple Tarot just now I was especially struck by his Ten of Pentacles. It set off a lot of responses, including the meaning I offer below in which I mention a hermit crab.

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS FOR THE TEN OF PENTACLES (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

Restrictive times, e.g. tight budget.

What you expect to come to you may not.

Don't buy this boredom or lassitude. It's a sign that new creative energy is about to emerge. Be open and willing to respond when it does.

Don't let the form you acquired in your current struggles continue to define you. Like a hermit crab who's outgrown its shell, shed it and allow a new form to develop.

There are implications beyond the completion that is upon you that you cannot see. Be prepared for surprises.

Celebrate where you came from and the gifts that were given to you both of nature and nurture.

You have accomplished a great deal. If you find yourself focussing on fear of losing it, it may be time to challenge yourself with something new.

There will always be community around us: helpful and not, fitting and not. Renewing and unchanging Spirit lies within and beyond these ties.


*MINI-REVIEW ALERT: I will go into the Simple Tarot at greater length and share more cards from it when I review Stone's Magic Mirror Tarot here in the future. However I do want to say it's an intriguing deck. The simple and varied black and white drawings are extremely evocative, and the words on each card are thought provoking. These cards offer uncomplicated doorways onto profound depths.

* * * *

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep honoring the gifts of nature and nurture, and enjoying The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Wednesday, November 22, 2006

THE FOOL (O)

TODAY'S CARD IS The Fool (O). This version is from The Minotarot, Artist: Eric Provoost, published 1982 Fontenay-sous-Bois France; the link is to The Mystic Eye where you can see more of the cards in this deck. (The little bits of colors other than brown, white or black in this image were introduced by the scanning process.)*



For comparison, here’s The Fool in the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE FOOL (O): I wanted to use a card from the Minotarot as it’s another deck that challenges my tastes and preferences in Tarot (see mini-review below), and I also wanted a chance to use the below Rumi quote that is perfect for The Fool.

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS FOR THE FOOL (O) (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

A tendency to gullibility.

Are you buying into what others project about themselves?

Are you trying to live out what others project on to you?

Impulsive risk, as opposed to a well considered risk as in The Justice card.

The risk you want to take is probably OK. Just be sure to listen to your intuition as you go along.

Don’t let anyone else’s negativity dampen your enthusiasm.

We never really know what our next step will bring, where it will take us. We are always, to a certain degree, about to step off into the unknown, guided by and trusting in our connection to Spirit.

QUOTE FROM RUMI:

Since intelligence only incites you to pride and vanity
Become a fool, so your heart stays pure.
Not a fool who wastes his life in playing the idiot
But a fool who is lost and astounded in [God/dess].


*MINI-REVIEW ALERT: I particularly value my Minotarot deck because it was given to me by a dear friend years ago. I can also appreciate, to a degree, it’s spare designs and coloration. That said, it’s not a deck I’ve ever read with and doubt I ever will, though I’m happy to have this signed deck, #1103 in a limited edition of 2,000, in my collection (:-D). However, it is one of those decks which attempts to correspond a different system to the Tarot’s without full explanation in accompanying literature. This is the second deck I have tried to work with recently that has not adequately explained its correspondence of The Tarot with another system. (The other is the Afro-Brazilian Tarot, which I will review at length here in the future.) To reiterate, if there is a deeper correspondence between Tarot and the Minotaur myth it needs to be made clear. Otherwise a reader – at least this reader – is left feeling frustrated on both fronts. It can neither be enjoyed as a doorway onto a new system, nor can it be fully appreciated as a Tarot since the minors and Court cards are rather divergent from basic Tarot images/meanings.

* * * *

Resource: The Discworld Tarot, based on the fantasy (and so much more ) book series by my favorite author in the world, Terry Pratchett.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep trusting in Spirit and enjoying The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Sunday, November 19, 2006

THE QUEEN OF PENTACLES

TODAY'S CARD is The Queen of Pentacles. This version is from the 1987 deck, The New York Tarot, by Giani Siri, Sirius Endeavors, P.O. Box 17, New York, NY 10040, USA.



For comparison, here's the Queen of Pentacles in the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE QUEEN OF PENTACLES: I really love the Queen of Pentacles in the New York Tarot. It captures important aspects of this card, e.g. generosity and abundance, in a simple and direct way. (In case it's not clear from the scan that's a pizza in front of her.) The Queen of Pentacles is one of my family of cards (determined by astrology and numerology). Decades ago a friend of mine said if others knew me the way she did they'd see what a marshmallow I really am. Imagine my surprise and amusement, then, when I discovered years later that the herb for this card in The Herbal Tarot is marshmallow. :-) I wrote the poem I share below as a gift for a Queen of Pentacles-like woman friend.

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS FOR THE QUEEN OF PENTACLES (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

Not comfortable needing or relying upon others. Self-sufficient, maybe to a fault.

Making do on less better than anyone else.

May indicate financial woes or deprivation of some sort.

Can work little miracles with diet and nutrition.

Compassion is needed here, for yourself, for others.

Are you trying to control what you cannot? To be caring is one thing. To feel responsible for everything is something else entirely.

Be careful not to take on other people's feelings and fears as you care for and nurture them.


PORTRAIT OF "M" AS GODDESS OF ABUNDANCE
(a Winter Solstice gift, 1990)

The Lady returns to Her forest home,
bearing nuts and seeds, flowers, roots
and berries in Her baskets of reed,
Her cape of leaves trailing lightly behind her.

Small creatures leap and scurry
around Her as She glides,
as if to celebrate
the abundance She shares.

A chipmunk rides the hem
of Her cape, falls off
and clambers back, chattering
at birds circling
and singing above.

Silence descends as The Lady settles
on a bed of leaves and pine needles
before an ancient oak.

A mother lion strides lazily
forward through the gathering
of forest creatures, stretches
and curls at Her feet.

The Lady bends to stroke
Her golden beast, a shaft
of light dancing
in Her dark, dark, hair.


* * * *

*MINI-REVIEW ALERT: I've lived in New York City since I was five, so I was delighted years ago when I heard of this deck. Not only am I familiar with many of the places in the black and white photos, I had met or knew of several of the people on these cards when I was still somewhat active in the Pagan community (before I realized I'm basically a solitary). For readers familiar with astrology, this deck has a card each for the signs of the zodiac, as well. It also has an extra court card -- The Dame -- that fits between the Knight and the King, with the Queen coming after the King (i.e, last in the order). The Dame of Wands is an all too familiar sight in big cities, I'm afraid, and gave me quite a wry laugh: she's standing behind a store counter holding a baseball bat. Unfortunately, all too appropriate. LOL! I'd definitely recommend this deck for collectors and New Yorkers, and newbies who don't faze easily. (There are connections to the traditional Tarot images in these photos, but they are in an urban, modern setting and not all the connections are immediately apparent.)

* * * *

Resource: The Buffy Tarot, yes, I'm a Buffy fan, still going through withdrawal since it's no longer in re-runs here on broadcast T.V.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep nurturing where you can, having compassion for all, and enjoying The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Wednesday, November 15, 2006

THE TEN OF CUPS

TODAY'S CARD IS The Ten of Cups. This version is from The Voyager Tarot*:



For comparison, here's The Ten of Cups in the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE TEN OF CUPS: I love the autumnal colors on The Voyager Tarot Ten of Cups above and have been enjoying the lovely fall weather we've been having here in New York City, so that's why I chose it for today's post. Also, decades ago, when first exposed to the RWS version I had a vague sense of intensity that the more traditional meanings of the card do not indicate, nor does the RWS design really imply. Then I bought The Thoth Tarot and in that deck this card is called "Satiety." Ah Hah, I thought, this comes close to what I have been feeling about the Ten of Cups. Then many years later I got the Voyager Tarot and saw the Ten of Cups is called "Passion." I'll let it suffice that both Satiety and Passion reflect a bit of the intensity and even tendency to overwhelm I often feel is implied in this card. Traditional designs/meanings indicate a sort of light romantic happiness and togetherness, and these are certainly also readings for this card.

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS FOR THE TEN OF CUPS (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

You are about to reach your limit in an emotionally charged situation.

A psychic once told me that I was more connected to souls who have already passed over than to souls in this life and I immediately thought of the Ten of Cups. I see that as a possible reading for this card, i.e. a mediumistic tendency.

Over-indulgence, either literally with food and/or libation, or in emotions or an activity.

Spiritual community.

Yearning for a sense of community.

Is this the right community for you? What does being in it cost you? Does it make use of your skills and talents? Conversely, you may feel more "at home" if you give more of yourself to the community. I.e., take some risks.

In my Ten of Swords post I mention that this card can represent the negative experiences a highly sensitive person can sometimes have in our society. The Ten of Cups can represent the positive aspects of being highly sensitive, i.e, deeply connected to others by intuition and empathy. It can also represent these gifts of intuition and empathy that the highly sensitive person brings to any community.

I rarely quote others' card meanings but I think what the book for The Herbal Tarot (U.S. Games) says about this card is very important: "We can learn life's lessons through joyfulness and bliss and not, as it is so often thought, only through pain and grief."


*MINI-REVIEW ALERT: The Voyager Tarot is a gorgeous deck, and one of the most beautifully produced I've seen. However, it is one of those decks I cannot read with. The art lover in me over-rides the intuitive reader and I can do nothing but gawk and appreciate the cards' beauty. (I find this same problem with a couple other visually stunning decks, like The Gilded Tarot.) This is by no means a criticism of the deck, especially as I imagine other readers might well find this deck's rich imagery very stimulating. In either case, this is a deck well worth having in a collection. I take it out every so often just to look through it. It's a feast for the eyes and the spirit whether one reads with it or not.

* * * *

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep opening to the joy of The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Monday, November 13, 2006

THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE REDUX



In keeping with my recent desire to explore decks whose images push me past my personal comfort zone (taste in art, or subject matter, etc.; e.g. see my review of The Manga Tarot), I'm sharing about The Barbie Tarot here today.

Yes, can you believe it? I reveal my preconceptions (or prejudices, by other's lights I suppose) by saying this, but I really could not imagine a Barbie Tarot being all that interesting. Well, bowl me over with that proverbial feather. It's not bad at all. Not great, but it is fun and I can see the reasoning for the choices of dolls to illustrate each of the cards. The Lovers, Strength and The Hanging Girl are especially fun and to the "point."

The Wheel of Fortune, above, however, knocked my socks off. I've addressed The Wheel before here (The Wheel of Fortune post), so won't go into it any further other than to add this meaning that occurred to me during a reading recently:

The archetypal "vicious circle." Going round and round and getting nowhere.

But I basically just wanted to share this unique rendering of The Wheel of Fortune card. As well as share the link to the entire Barbie deck (under the image above).

* * * *

Resource: Forgive me if I play a bit more with The Tarot (I've been too blue for too long), here's a link to a deck with images of toys: playtarot card gallery.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep being open to the incredible variety of The Tarot universe,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Saturday, November 11, 2006

Part IV: THE FANTASY SHOWCASE TAROT


Card on the LEFT above: V, The Hierophant (High Priest) in The Fantasy Showcase Tarot.
Card on the RIGHT above: V, The High Priest (Hierophant) in The Tarot of the Cat People.


And so here's the fourth and final installment in my sharing from The Fantasy Showcase Tarot (a 26 year old deck, 85 card deck, in which each card was designed by a different science fiction or fantasy artist; see previous three posts for details).

Both cards above were done by Karen Kuykendall. The one on the left between 1969 and 1980 (when The Fantasy Showcase Tarot was published) and the one on the right probably subsequent to the one on the left for her Tarot of the Cat People which was published in 1985. There's a clear design relationship between the two.

Karen's Tarot of the Cat People is one of my personal favorite decks to work with and I'll definitely do a review with other sample images in the future. The High Priest above is one of the least impressive cards in this deck. (E.g., one can barely discern the cat faces around his chest. In other cards, cats are integral to the design. In the Knights, they are large enough to be ridden like horses. :-D)

Anyway, I'll leave more on The Tarot of the Cat People for another post and close my exploration of The Fantasy Showcase Tarot with thanks again to Oino for triggering my re-interest in it.

* * * *

Resource: The Deck Is Out There: Three Simple Principles to Help You Find the Tarot Deck of Your Dreams; just in case the diveristy of images I share on this blog is confusing, here's some thorough thinking on choosing a deck.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep enjoying the endlessly entertaining universe of The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Thursday, November 09, 2006

Part III: THE FANTASY SHOWCASE TAROT

Make sure to see the previous two posts here about The Fantasy Showcase Tarot for more details on this 26 year old, 85 card deck, each card of which was designed by a different science fiction or fantasy artist. I promised in Part II about this deck to post the cards by Kelly Freas, John Kirby, and Karen Kuykendall. But before I do I want to share the Three of Wands, by Evelyn Turner, which IMHO is a perfect progressing of this card into a (no longer so) future scenario:


LEFT: Fantasy Showcase. RIGHT: Rider/Waite/Smith.
















This next card is The Star, by Kelly Freas. I can't say I'm overly fond of his art-style, although content-wise it is traditional:




And here's The Two of Cups by John Kirby. I'm not fond of this art-style, either, though again the content is quite traditional for the Two of Cups. My roommate, after looking through The Fantasy Showcase Tarot, showed me artwork by Kirby on a Terry Pratchett book cover. His style works better there, I think, than with Tarot. Though I hasten to add this is a personal preference (i.e, I generally don't care for the idealization and/or objectification of women's bodies in art, or of men's, for that matter):



OK, so now blogger has made a liar out of me again. It won't upload the two Karen Kuykendall cards I wanted to share to end this post. So I'll have to set those aside for a final post about this deck, a Part IV. Argh!

At any rate, I hope the journey through this unique deck is fun. For all the misery I'm having with uploading images, it's wonderful exploring the artwork in this Tarot again.

* * * *

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep enjoying the amazing unviverse of The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Sunday, November 05, 2006

Part II: THE FANTASY SHOWCASE TAROT

Be sure to see the post immediately prior to this one for more complete information on this 26 year old 85 card deck, each card of which was designed by a different science fiction or fantasy artist. As I promised in that post, here are additional selections from the deck. (Now that I am able to upload the images, which I had not been able to do when I was working on the previous post.)

Although the nine cards below give some indication of the amazing variety of styles and implicit meanings of this unique deck, it does not do it full justice by any means. I'll just have to post samples from it in the future.:-)


FIRST CARD -- Five of Pentacles (artist Reed Waller). For some reason I have a King Midas association to this version. It's not clear in this scan but it's a couple embracing in the picture the lion is holding and he looks distinctly disturbed, outside of it all maybe -- a rather Five of Pentacles experience. :-)
SECOND CARD -- Nine of Cups (artist Gary Anderson), I love this space frog, bellying up to the bar. Talk about happiness!
THIRD CARD -- Ten of Cups (artist Randy Bathurst), another amusing interpretation, that can also be very pointed. The scene in the blitzed gnome's dream is from the actual Rider/ Waite/ Smith Ten of Cups.




FIRST CARD -- The Fool (artist Bruce Duncan), usually The Fool is at the edge of a cliff in danger of walking off it. This version is both funny and intriguing. I began to see it as a Fool card up-dated for modern times.
SECOND CARD -- The Wheel Fortune (artist Linda Miller), the traditional title of this card says it all! Though this is an untraditional way of representing it.
THIRD CARD -- The Seven of Swords (artist George Jones), one of the few "hard sci-fi" designs in the deck. I really like how dynamic it is and the light refractions.



FIRST CARD -- The Six of Wands (artist Jane & Philip Hagopian), I really like this art style. The interpretation itself is traditional.
SECOND CARD -- The Hermit (artist James Patrick), another art style I find very moving. It's not usual for The Hermit to be at the edge of a cliff -- this put me in mind of The Fool above.
THIRD CARD -- Lady of Swords (artist Cecilia Cosentini), this is an additional card that the editor, Bruce Pelz, developed that does not exist in the traditional deck (The Lady, who fits between the Knight and the Queen of a suit). I really like both the art style and uncommon perspective.



In my next post, I'll share the cards by Kelly Freas, John Kirby, and Karen Kuykendall. The latter is the designer of the Tarot of the Cat People. Kuykendall created an entire fantasy world for the Tarot of the Cat People, one in which each of the four realms/cultures reveres cats. Her design in The Fantasy Showcase Tarot is The Hierophant/High Priest, and is clearly related to her High Priest/Hierophant design in The Tarot of the Cat People (published in 1985). I'll post both cards here.

* * * *

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep enjoying the wild and wondrous universe of The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Friday, November 03, 2006

THE FANTASY SHOWCASE TAROT (Comments & Sample Cards)

THE FANTASY SHOWCASE TAROT, Little White Book ("LWB") Cover; The Empress card (artist Maxine Miller), which is in color, of course, on the actual card.


I suppose I could have as readily called this a review, only this deck is 26 years old and out of print, originally published by U.S. Games in 1980, with some of its card designs going back as far as 1969. I recalled it while answering comments to my earlier post here on The Chariot card about what it would be like reading with a deck with artwork by 78 different artists. The Fantasy Showcase Tarot has 85 cards by 85 different artists. The extras being two new Majors designed for the deck ("Separation" XXII, and "The Farrier" XXIII) and an innovation of the editor’s ("The Lady," a young woman who fits between the Knight and The Queen of the Court cards).

The cards were done entirely by fantasy and science fiction artists. Many clearly reflect the style of the times (see the Three of Cups below) and that brings back many memories of my own hippie years. But many still appear timeless and I will post some examples of this type in the future. The cards range from humorous to artistic. Many offer interpretations of the cards that are intriguing to me to this day.

This is not a deck I have ever been able to read with. Not only due to the incredible overwhelming diversity of styles, but because the cards frequently are not clearly labeled. The designs are in a couple of cases so different from traditional Tarot it is a huge challenge to identify which cards they are.* However, I can’t stress enough that for me it is an utterly delightful deck to have as a panorama of possible Tarot art styles and interpretations. And being a huge fantasy and science fiction fan, who at one time collected books and prints of fantasy artists’ work, it’s a particular delight. Kudos to Bruce Pelz, editor, the originator of the idea who pulled it all together.

I initially selected a dozen cards to share, in a range of styles in this deck. However, I have been having an extremely difficult time uploading images to blogger for days now. (I thought, from the coding in my pages, I had succeeded finally in getting all 12 of the cards loaded. However, nine of them are only lovely pastel boxes, with no images in them. Grrrrrr.....) So, suffice it to say I only have the three below to share. Unfortunately, only three cards cannot reflect the incredible, fantastic diversity of this deck's designs.

FIRST CARD -- Three of Cups (very 1960's in style, as many of the cards are, but each in their unique way), artist Ellen Green.
SECOND CARD -- Separation XXII (one of the new Majors), artist Gordon Monson. Meanings from the LWB: Loneliness; inability to communicate with others. Conversely, reconciliation; unity of purpose; sharing of emotions.
THIRD CARD -- The Farrier XXIII (the other new Major), artist Dian Crayne. Meanings from the LWB: Forces of the universe; destiny's hand. Conversely, lack of purpose; randomity.




As blogger's system permits, I'll post additional designs from this unique deck in the future. The Fantasy Showcase Tarot has universes that are well worth wandering through and wondering over. (Note of November 5, 2006 -- the next two posts will be about this deck.)

* * * *

* Some cards don’t have signatures or even initials so they cannot be found in the little white book, which has the artists' names by their cards. There’s a note you may have read above on the back outside page of the booklet, that the cards are packed in the order in which they are listed in the little white book. But I only saw that too late. I tend to shuffle and read without even cracking any accompanying book/let that comes with a deck, just to get a first fresh feel of the deck. I can imagine many folk missed that note, too. I may someday re-order the deck by the booklet as much as possible, then see if I can determine how which "left-over" card might fit which "empty" space.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep enjoying the wild and wondrous universe of The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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Wednesday, November 01, 2006

THE TEN OF SWORDS

TODAY'S CARD is the Ten of Swords. This version is from The Manga Tarot, published by Llewellyn and LoScarabeo. (See my recent review of this deck.)



For comparison, here's the Ten of Swords in the Rider/Waite/Smith deck:



THE TEN OF SWORDS: I chose the Ten of Swords for today because I find myself intrigued by the Manga Tarot version; see below for a meaning I gleaned from it. I have a lot of meanings for the Ten of Swords as years back it used to come up in my personal readings a great deal. But before I go on to share them I want to stress that the Ten of Swords carries not only the traditional possible meaning of "Ruin," but of impending rebirth. Note that the sun is just starting to rise in the RWS version above; the dawn is beginning. And in another deck, the Barbara Walker Tarot, a woman in black who's standing near the sword-pierced figure is clearly pregnant. It is also interesting to note that on the Manga version, of the four seasonal glyphs (see the three ideograms in circles on the card) the one missing is spring. (My review of the Manga Tarot goes into which glyph is which.) To me this implies that spring is just about to arrive, to not lose heart.

DIFFERENT OR LESS COMMON, EVEN QUIRKY MEANINGS (i.e. the below is not intended to be an exhaustive exploration of this card; a quick google will produce a wider variety of takes should you not be familiar with this card):

Fear of falling out of a good state into ruin.

How a highly intutive and/or psychic person can sometimes experience being around others: invaded and/or overwhelmed.

"Back-stabbing," either real or imagined. Maybe someone who has been actually back-stabbed so much she is almost "spineless" now. (Highly senstive folk tend to be in danger of this, as they are not understood by others very well. See meaning directly above.)

Paranoia.

Meaning I gleaned from the Manga Tarot version above: It is painful to face our fears and wounds. But spring and growth can only come by having the courage to let go of denial.

You can do what you are set on doing, but something else is going to happen and you might do better to be more open to alternative actions.

There are many things motivating you right now. Be still until it is clear which are the right ones to respond to or act on.

Acupuncture.

If the question is about health and/or nutrition: it might be good to eat lightly for a few days. (This card can refer to a feeling of emptiness.)

Don't struggle against the times. The more you go with it all, the better it will go and the sooner things will change for the better.

There is a bottom line beyond which this situation will not go. So it may be hard, but you will survive.


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Resource: The Wander and The Wayfarer, nice introduction to The Tarot, with especially clear section of the general meanings of numbers in The Tarot.

Please see the top of the sidebar for my background with the Tarot and a recommendation to beginners.

‘til next time, keep looking to the dawn, and enjoying The Tarot,

Roswila

[aka: Patricia Kelly]

****If you wish to copy or use any of my writing, please email me for permission (under “View my complete profile”)**** SEE ALSO: Roswila’s Dream & Poetry Realm for some articles about Tarot.****

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